Disease States

Blood Pressure
Blood pressure tends to rise with age. Following a healthy lifestyle helps some people delay or prevent this rise in blood pressure.

High blood pressure increases your chance (or risk) for getting heart disease and/or kidney disease, and for having a stroke. It is especially dangerous since it often has no warning signs or symptoms. Regardless of race, age, or gender, anyone can develop high blood pressure. It is estimated that one in every four American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it usually lasts a lifetime.

High blood pressure can eventually cause blood vessels in the eye to burst or bleed. Vision may become blurred or otherwise impaired and can result in blindness. As people get older, arteries throughout the body “harden,” especially those in the heart, brain, and kidneys. High blood pressure is associated with these “stiffer” arteries. This, in turn, causes the heart and kidneys to work harder. The kidneys act as filters to rid the body of wastes. Over time, high blood pressure can narrow and thicken the blood vessels of the kidneys. The kidneys filter less fluid, and waste builds up in the blood. The kidneys may fail altogether.

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack. The arteries bring oxygen-carrying blood to the heart muscle. If the heart cannot get enough oxygen, chest pain, also known as “angina,” can occur. If the flow of blood is blocked, a heart attack results. High blood pressure is the number one risk factor for congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF is a serious condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to supply the body’s needs.

The important nutrients needed by a person suffering from high blood pressure are Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, and Vitamin E.  Vitamin C helps support the body’s production of nitric oxide, which is critical to normal functioning of blood vessels. The better your blood vessels work, the lower your risk of hypertension. Calcium is needed for smooth muscle relaxation and contraction; increased consumption can have a direct effect on blood vessels. It’s best to get your calcium from your diet; studies have found that compared with supplements, dietary calcium has twice the benefits for blood pressure.

Potassium acts by increasing sodium excretion in the urine, which helps blood vessels dilate, and changing the interactions of hormones that affect blood pressure.

Diet high in magnesium benefits those with hypertension, most likely by contributing to the relaxation of the smooth muscles of the blood vessels.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by constant high levels of blood glucose (sugar). Human body has to maintain the blood glucose level at a very narrow range, which is done with insulin and glucagons.

The abnormally high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) resulting from insufficient levels of the hormone insulin which is characteristic symptoms polyuria, polydipsia, glucoseuria, unexplained weight loss, and lethargy. There are two types of diabetes: Type I diabetes known as insulin dependent diabetes and Type II diabetes refer to insulin non dependent diabetes.  Diabetes II can be avoided through proper dieting, medication and regular exercise.

Diabetes will lead to complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular problems etc., researchers recently reported that vitamin D is essential for the islet cells in the pancreas to be able to secrete insulin properly. The studies have shown that individuals with  low vitamin D levels experienced the worst blood sugar-handling problems and had a greater risk of developing diabetes. Ascorbic acid helps in insulin secretion. It is interesting to note that certain nutrients like vitamins B1, B2, B12, pantothenic acid, vitamin C, protein and potassium – along with small frequent meals containing some carbohydrate – can actually stimulate production of insulin within the body.

Vitamin A as an antioxidant helps convert beta-carotene efficiently, which reduces the risk of blindness in diabetics. Vitamin B 12 can help people suffering form diabetic neuropathy. High dose supplements of vitamin C have been shown to prevent sorbitol accumulation and glycosylation of proteins, both of which are important factors in the development of diabetic complications such as cataracts. Studies have shown that a low vitamin-E concentration was associated with a 3.9 times greater risk of developing diabetes. Vitamin E reduces oxidative stress, thus improving membrane physical characteristics and related activities in glucose transport. This antioxidant promotes healing of diabetes-related lesions. Magnesium helps in the metabolism of glycogen, Mg works closely with vitamin B 6 to help the metabolic process with in the cell.

Oxidation and the Immune System
If you want to stay healthy, you need to feed your body properly. Although it is recommended to eat several servings of fruits and vegetables, the food pyramid is considered by many to be inadequate for individuals who are trying to maintain their optimum health. So we need supplements which will provide the entire essential nutrients needed by our body.

Nutrient supplement is recommended because it helps digest the food by supplying the minerals for effective digestion. This will help your body to totally absorb all the food nutrients.

Oxidative by-products of normal metabolism cause extensive damage to DNA, protein, and lipid.

Research is increasingly showing that those who eat antioxidant-rich foods reap health benefits. 

Antioxidants are also involved in the prevention of cellular damage — the common pathway for  a variety of diseases. Athletes have a keen interest because of health concerns and the prospect of enhanced performance and/or recovery from exercise. Increased intake of vitamin E is a protection against exercise induced oxidative damage.

Aging affects our social environment. Symptoms of old age includes wrinkles and liver spots on the skin, hair loss , lessened hearing , poor eyesight , slower reaction times and agility , reduced ability to think clearly , difficulty recalling memories , greater susceptibility to bone diseases such as osteoarthritis. Elderly people tend to have lower body temperatures and infections that would cause fever. Elderly pneumonia sufferers may present symptoms such as rapid breathing, reduced appetite and reduced functioning. Elderly urinary tract infection sufferers may present symptoms such as incontinence, confusion and may suffer from falls.

Vitamin A (Beta Carotene), Vitamin B1 (Thiamine), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Vitamin B6 Pyrodixine), Vitamin B7 (Biotin), Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid), Vitamin D (Cholecalciferol), Vitamin E (Tocopherol) and Vitamin K. Vitamin A is needed to protect your body against free radical damage to cells. Calcium and Vitamin D are essential to maintain strong bones and teeth.

Calcium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Magnesium, Manganese and Zinc. Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Blood coagulation, transmission of nerve impulses, muscle contraction and relaxation, normal heart beat, stimulation of hormone secretion, activation of enzyme reactions, as well as other functions, all require small amounts of calcium. After age 50, more calcium or 1,200 milligrams are needed. As you age, minerals in your bones are lost and bones may get thinner.

Iron, helps in the formation of hemoglobin and myoglobin, which carry the oxygen in the blood and the muscle. Iron also makes up part of many proteins and enzymes in the body, deficiency of which leads to the weakening of the immune system, helps in improving the mental ability as the oxygen supply to the brain increases.

Under Nutrition in Children and Adults
Lack of consumption of balanced nutrients or feeding the wrong kind of food leads to an accumulation of toxins within the body, resulting in chronic diseases. Since no single food group can nourish the body with all the vital ingredients it requires, it is important that we consume a variety of healthy foods to derive the nutrition our body needs. Children are the vulnerable groups, they need complete nutrition for their growth, physical and mental fitness.

When children do not eat enough fruits and vegetables they run the risk of having low intakes of vitamins A and C. B Complex Vitamins (thiamin, niacin, riboflavin and other B vitamins) come from a variety of foods, including grain products, meat and meat substitutes and dairy products. Most of the children are not consuming the healthy foods instead they are attracted towards the mal-nutrient snack foods.

When appetites slow down and children do not seem to be eating nutritiously, concerned parents consider using a vitamin-mineral supplement.

Vitamins and other nutrients are critically important for the proper physical, cognitive and even emotional development of young children. Vitamins, minerals and other essential nutrients help create the neurotransmitters that relay signals between these brain Children who do not get adequate nutrition in their first few years of life are more likely to have problems throughout life. This includes lower IQ, slower language and motor development, and poor school performance.